BELPERRON NYC

As I’ve begun to dip my toes back into the waters of a semi-regular blogging schedule, I’ve discovered some real gems (read on and you’ll see what I did there) in my drafts folder. Bright spots of inspiration that have stood out (to me at least) in an increasingly homogenous internet landscape. That’s a conversation for a different day, but for now, let’s admire the literal jewel box that is Belperron.

This draft dated back to 2016, and to the best of my recollection was inspired by this feature, this New York Times article, and likely some low grade stalking of architect, Daniel Romualdez.

So here’s the skinny: Suzanne Belperron was a legendary French jewelry designer in the 1930s with a client roster that included bold face names like Elsa Schiaparelli, the Duchess of Windsor and Diana Vreeland.

Daniel Romualdez | Belperron

Her designs were unmatched, but her legacy has gotten somewhat lost because she rarely signed her work. When asked why, she famously responded: “my style is my signature” which makes me feel equal parts inspired by her self confidence, and also wishing she could have read this WSJ article with Reese Witherspoon and assertively taken credit where it was due. Again, a conversation for a different day.

In 1998, the Landrigan family, helmed by Ward Landrigan, former head of Sotheby’s jewelry, and current chairman of the equally storied jewelry house, Verdura, acquired the Belperron archives. Last year, in partnership with AD Top 100 designer,  Daniel Romualdez, Belperron opened a New York City showroom.

Daniel Romualdez | Belperron

Simply put, like all of Daniel Romualdez’s work, it’s perfect. He was tasked with transforming a previously soulless white box into a space that recalled the Parisienne apartment of Madame Belperron. I think most of us could be perfectly content moving in, so I’d say he was successful.

Daniel excels at what I’d describe as approachable glamour. Naturally, the atelier of a high end jeweler calls for a certain level of luxury, and the black lacquer, mirrored, marble, and brass finishes certainly achieve that, but the casual seating groups and care taken accessorizing with books and art contributes to the feeling that this is more home than showroom.

Daniel Romualdez | Belperron

My favorite details are the reproduction of a Matisse drawing of Dorothy Paley wearing Belperron emerald cuffs hanging above that stunner of a fireplace, and how Daniel chose to sprinkle the display cases throughout the space, at times incorporating them into the millwork. Doesn’t it feel like you’re admiring someone’s private collection?

If you have a minute, be sure to scroll through the Belperron archives. I’ve found so much inspiration in the sculptural shapes and color combinations. This in particular seems like a no brainer for my Christmas list (ha!)

FALL LAYERS

The temperatures are finally starting to dip here in Raleigh, and I’m finding myself craving another layer in my interiors equally as much as I find myself reaching for another layer (this, please) as I get dressed. Here are a few of the places and spaces that have been inspiring me.

Robert Kime | Architectural Digest

I consider British designer Robert Kime the ultimate expert in the art of layering, and with a client roster that includes the Prince of Wales, I’m clearly not the only one. What I admire most about Robert’s work–and this project in particular–is his ability to create an inviting atmosphere in even the grandest of settings.

Robert Kime | Architectural Digest

In the hands of a less skilled designer, massive ceiling heights and imposing oil paintings could have easily become haughty, but a liberal use of jewel toned textiles in a variety of textures–mohair, velvet, and linen–and exotic patterns instantly cuts the formality and lends a feeling of coziness to the space. An enviable collection of antiques act as a counterbalance and tips the scales back towards formality.

Michelle Nussbaumer

We’re hosting Thanksgiving this year, but with two photoshoots scheduled on Tuesday and Wednesday, I’m beginning to realize the tablescape at my own home may be neglected this year (at least I’ll have flowers!) In an ideal world, I’d be channeling this lovely situation by Michelle Nussbaumer.

Soane Britain

More inspiration from across the pond care of Soane Britain. My sister teases me for the amount of animal art that has somewhat unintentionally made it’s way into our home (a huge Indian hunt scene on silk featuring a tiger above our fireplace, a wicker giraffe lamp by Mario Lopez Torres on my desk, etc.) so, unsurprisingly, I’m super into that lion above this fabulous suzani sofa.

Pierre Frey | Veranda

I was happy to stumble upon this fabulous bedroom featuring the less frequently seen red colorway of Pierre Frey’s iconic Toiles de Nantes. It’s so lively wrapped above the arch and paired with the Jacobean patterned headboard, bedspread, and leopard carpet. More is more.

Anna Spiro

Lastly, I never cease to be inspired by Australian designer, Anna Spiro. Her use of color, pattern, and art is unparalleled. This sofa is inspiring me to encourage clients to be more bold in their upholstery choices.

And that’s my brain dump and desktop cleanup for you, I hope you found some inspiration as well!

A VISIT TO SIR JOHN SOANE’S MUSEUM

The Wall Street Journal published a great article this weekend about Sir John Soane’s Museum in London which I was happy to stumble upon as I was reminded of some sneaky photos (can’t stop, won’t stop) that have remained unshared from our visit almost two years ago.

In a city with behemoths like the British Museum and the Victoria & Albert, Sir John Soane’s Museum is a more unassuming presence, but still delivers inspiration in a big way.

Comprised of three adjacent townhouses purchased and combined in the late 17th and early 18th centuries by one of England’s most venerable architects, Sir John Soane, the museum is chockablock–literally floor to ceiling–with Soane’s various collections.

At every turn you’re visually assaulted with corbels, capitals, friezes, funerary urns, bits of entablature, pieces of architrave, architectural models, drawings, and paintings, all meticulously arranged and hung to impart optimal effect.

There are over 40,000 objects total (you might say Sir John Soane was the original maximalist) acquired and assembled over a lifetime. If you’ve been to the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, consider Sir John Soane’s Museum the British pre-curser.

Unlike Barnes (watch The Art of the Steal for the backstory here), Soane’s wishes that his home remain intact and open to the public free of charge (save for “wet or dirty weather”) were protected by an Act of Parliament.

It really is a fantastic gem that I hope to return to again one day and highly suggest visiting if you should find yourself in London.

BITS & PIECES

Ah, September 1st. It’s better than New Year’s in my book. A fresh start. New notebooks. A return to routine and productivity after the indulgent months of summer. So much promise!

I woke up this morning feeling rather gung-ho about the whole thing. Today would be the day I commit to writing in the 5 Minute Journal my sister gifted me for my birthday last year daily rather than haphazardly, followed by diligently opening my Headspace app instead of Instagram.

Naturally, I’d join in on the September Whole 30 in an attempt to undo the sins of the past three months and maybe with all of this newfound enthusiasm I’ll finally make it past week three of BBG.

We’ll see how I fare with those pursuits, I know the shine of a new month tends to wear off somewhat quickly as life gets in the way, but I’m savoring this feeling while I can. For now, I just wanted to stop in to say hi and share some beautiful bits & pieces from my desk: antique mall artwork and delicious fabrics.

Happy Labor Day weekend and I hope we can catch up soon.

COASTAL LIVING IDEA HOUSE | NEWPORT, RI (PART II)

I hope you enjoyed part one of my mini tour of the Coastal Living Idea House in Newport, Rhode Island! Today I’ll take you through the rest of the home, starting with my very favorite room.

Walking into this serene master bedroom felt like releasing a big exhale. The panoramic water views, enveloping Mark Sikes for Schumacher upholstered walls, and soothing color palette were heaven. I don’t know how anyone could ever get out of bed.

I spent a good amount of time admiring Mark’s window treatments. In this room, woven inside mount Roman shades were paired with drapes.

Pairing two florals like this isn’t for the faint of heart, but the smaller scale, more structured pattern of the drapery floral (can anyone ID? I’m drawing a blank!) complements the larger vining pattern on the walls rather than competes.

Setting up one nightstand to work double duty as a desk is a great trick.

One of my favorite dhurries from Mark’s collection for Merida Studio is layered over a larger Merida wool rug.

P.S these gold gladiator style lace ups I’m wearing above have been such a great addition to my summer shoe collection!

More upholstered walls and a fabulous abstract by Catherine Jones.

Brass frames and sconces throughout the home add warmth and contrast against the cool blues.

This grouping of botanicals balanced out the room’s high ceilings and framed the headboard nicely. If you love the look of the peacock wicker headboard, don’t miss theses amazing vintage options here!

I’m kicking myself again for not getting the manufacturer of this gorgeous spool leg and paper cord chair which looks to coordinate with the counter stools used in the kitchen.

Let’s continue upstairs to another of my favorite spaces. This room spilled out onto a roof deck and had the most perfect unobstructed views of the water. A wet bar and full bath make it such a multifunctional space.

This daybed is so chic. I keep trying to find a space for it in my own home to no avail.

Casually stacked artwork is the perfect way to dress up an otherwise uninteresting knee wall.

Even on pillows no detail was spared: brush fringe, tassels, and serged edges decorate some of my favorite Carolina Irving fabrics.

Skirted tables are always a classic addition to a space and have the added benefit of providing concealed storage.

One last drapery detail shot featuring a favorite China Seas fabric.

For those of you who aren’t able to visit the showhouse in person, I hope you enjoyed tagging along virtually. If you’re in New England I’d highly recommend a visit. Proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Club.

I truly believe Mark Sikes will go down as one of the legendary designers of our time, so it was such a treat to see his inspiring work in person and be able to admire all of the details I’ve come to appreciate up close.